Iceland

Skogar

Skogar

Iceland

Reykjavik

Reykjavik

Iceland

Hvolsvollur

Hvolsvollur

Iceland

Multi-day Trips Iceland

Two people, including a person in a wheelchair, pose for a photo in front of the geyser.

6 days / 5 Nights

Iceland Nature, Hot Springs, and Splendid Waterfalls: 6 Days Fully Accessible Tour

Reykjavik

This accessible tour will introduce you to some of the highlights of the magical country of Iceland. You’ll experience adventures such as a private guided drive through Iceland’s Golden Circle and a swim in the famous Blue Lagoon. There is also some free time for you to explore the capital Reykjavik at your own pace and to discover Iceland’s history and culture. Accessible accommodation in authentic Icelandic lodges is included in the price, as is breakfast. This trip is adapted to suit people with disabilities, with wheelchair-accessible accommodation and transportation. Round-trip transportation between the airport and your accommodation is also provided, with several accommodation options available, all of which are accessible. The itinerary can also be adjusted to suit your interests and ability.

Things to Do + Places to Stay + Ground transportation


About Iceland

With its dramatic landscapes, Iceland has become a popular tourist destination. Filled with fjords, glaciers, volcanoes and geysers, this "Land of Fire & Ice" offers a change to experience a unique side of nature. Due to its extreme northern location, summer days are long and winter days are short, and it's a great place to observe the northern lights spectacle. A small but innovative country, almost all of Iceland's power comes from renewable geothermal and hydropower energy sources.

Accessible travel Iceland

Iceland has made a lot of progress in making its infrastructure accessible. All buildings constructed after 2012 must provide access for mobility aids. Public transportation doe not offer lift or ramps outside of the city's capital, nor do buses offer a space for people to remain in their wheelchairs. The country has a National Association of People with Disabilities known as Sjálfsbjörg, which conducts routine surveys on museums and public spaces, for accessibility improvement. They offer a website, partially available in English, which lists various asscessible attractions in Iceland. You can check out the website here.
https://www.sjalfsbjorg.is/english/